In February 1991, Tribes gathered in the Sacred Black Hills of South Dakota. Nineteen Tribes from all four directions attended. Lakota representatives from several of the reservations in South Dakota were there, as well as the Crow, Shoshone-Bannock, Gros Ventre/Assinoboine, and Blackfeet Nations of Montana. Various Pueblo representatives from New Mexico, and the Winnebago, traditionally called Ho Chunk, from both Nebraska and Wisconsin came. Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, and some as far west as Round Valley of California arrived. Some of these tribes were historically enemies, but they united for a common mission…

To restore bison on Tribal lands for cultural and spiritual enhancement and preservation.

Bison (Bison bison), or as commonly referred to by Tribal people “buffalo”, has always held great meaning for the American Indian people. Buffalo represent their spirit and remind them of how their lives were once lived, free and in harmony with nature. In the 1800’s, the white-man recognized the reliance Indian tribes had on the buffalo. Thus began the systematic destruction of buffalo as a means to subjugate western Tribal nations. The slaughter of over 60 million buffalo left only a few thousand buffalo remaining in the world.